What to do in Gyumri

The second largest city in Armenia, Gyumri, entered into the world news in 1988 when a strong earthquake severely damaged buildings and the city lost half of it's population. There are still many abandoned and collapsed buildings. Recent reconstructions and street revitalisations have turned the old town into an attractive place for cultural events and walking tours. Houses built in 18th century are built in traditional North Armenian style famous for using black and orange tuff stones.

The city is a cultural capital of Armenia with small galleries and museums. House-Museums of Hovhannes Shiraz, Avetik Isahakyan, and Mher Mkrtchyan, all of whom were famous for their artistic works in Armenian history. 

You can eat or drink coffee in one of the best Gyumri's non-smoking restaurants and cafes.

How to get to Gyumri

The cheapest and the most comfortable way how to get to Gyumri from Yerevan is by train. Trains between Yerevan and Gyumri run every day and depart from central railway stations. Commuter trains, known in post-soviet countries as "elektrichka", are equipped with simple wooden benches, toilets and widescreen windows. On Friday, Saturday and Sunday you can also take one of the fast trains which offer higher comfort. Ticket selling starts 30 minutes before train departure at the central railway station. Ordinary train ticket costs 1,000 AMD (2 EUR) and fast train ticket costs 2,500 AMD (a bit less than 5 EUR). Yerevan - Gyumri is one of the most scenic train ride in the world, it crosses steps and rocky desserts, so typical landscape for central Armenia.